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Lawmakers Go To Bat for Organic Trade

Senators say Jan. 1 close of Korean markets to U.S. organic exports will 'jeopardize a growing trade relationship'

Published on: Dec 19, 2013

If an equivalency agreement isn't drawn up and agreed to before Jan.1, U.S. organic exports to Korea could be halted, a group of legislators says, jeopardizing a growing trade relationship between the two nations.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and 12 Senate colleagues submitted a letter to Korean Ambassador Ahn Ho-Young Dec. 10 expressing concern about the market closure. The Senators asked the Ambassador to take steps to prevent any disruption in trade by keeping the Korean market open to products certified organic to the USDA National Organic Program standard, pending the negotiation of an equivalency agreement.

Senators say Jan. 1 close of Korean markets to U.S. organic exports will jeopardize a growing trade relationship
Senators say Jan. 1 close of Korean markets to U.S. organic exports will 'jeopardize a growing trade relationship'

Negotiations regarding organic trade between the U.S. and Korea have been ongoing since 2009, when the Korean Ag Ministry issued a series of regulations affecting organic production, labeling and enforcement. The rules were to take effect Jan. 1, 2010, but the Ministry delayed the regulations' implementation on complaints from the U.S. government and organic industry, as well as other partners, including Canada and the EU.

However, in May 2012, the Korean legislature passed a new Organic Act to take effect in 2014, which only covers processed products. As a result, all fresh/raw organic agricultural products and ingredients were shut out of Korea unless they were certified to the Korean standard.

On Jan. 1, 2014, processed products will also be shut out of Korea unless they are certified to the Korean standard, thus closing the market to all U.S. organic products not certified to the Korean organic standards.