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Climate Change Is Here, And It's Real

Panel of climate specialists says no matter the cause, climate change is a real issue

Published on: Apr 17, 2013

Climate change, no matter the cause, is real, a panel told North American Agricultural Journalists at their annual spring meeting in Washington, D.C., last week.

"We really have to get past talking about what is causing it and agreeing that we need mitigation and adaptation strategies," said Fred Yoder, a former president of the National Association of Corn Growers, who farms in Ohio. "In the end it doesn't matter one bit if it's a natural cycle or a man-made problem, we have to deal with it."

Bill Hohenstein, director of the USDA climate change program, said the scientific evidence that links increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere with increasing temperatures is conclusive.

Panel of climate change specialists say no matter the cause, climate change is a real issue
Panel of climate change specialists say no matter the cause, climate change is a real issue

"We are seeing evidence of the changing climate in the last decade or more with the last 14 or 15 years being the warmest on record," he said, "The thing we are seeing is that farmers are already adapting to this change; the challenge we face is an accelerating rate of change that makes it harder and harder to adapt."

Hohenstein said the U.S . will see more droughts, more floods and more erratic weather , such as the extremely warm November and December experienced in Wichita last year, followed by the wintry weather the area has experienced in March and April.

For crops, Hohenstein said farmers can expect a positive effect in longer growing season and the ability to grow more crops in areas where it was previously too cold.

However, these positives are likely to be offset by more extreme heat such as the 56 days of 100-degree-plus heat Wichita experienced in 2011 and the extreme drought that robbed yields across most of farm country in 2012.

Farmers can expect more heat and drought stress on crops such as soybeans and corn and water stress and late-season frost on wheat and small grains, Hohenstein said.

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Warmer winters will also mean more insects and more weeds as higher carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere spur more plant growth and vigor across a wide range of weeds.

Ernie Shea, who represented the organization 25x'25 on the NAAJ panel, said the organization is committed to making biofuels and other renewable energy sources supply 25% of the energy for America by the year 2525.

"It has been critical that we concentrate on reducing the amount of greenhouse gasses we are putting into the air," he said.

Lois Wright-Morton, a sociologist at Iowa State University, said the biggest challenge of all may come in the realm of communications.

"It is absolutely essential to get the message to farmers and ranchers that climate change is real and picking up speed," she said. "We need to help them get sound scientific advice about how to adapt to the consequences. We need to educate ag and forestry leaders on impacts and mobilize producers to advocate for taking action to adapt to change and mitigate the damage."

She acknowledged that farmers have already  make adaptations to the changing climate with moving to more no-till farming, more cover crops for plant diversity and soil health and changing cropping practices to grow more drought tolerant crops.

"All of these have helped," she said. But she agreed with Shea that the pace of change, which appears to be accelerating, could make it harder and harder for farmers to have time to adapt.

"We are going to see the need for better water management systems to help take advantage of extreme rainfall events to store water for future drought," she said. "We will need the contribution of better genetics, better risk management, better infrastructure to handle extreme events including flooding and heat waves and finally improved long-range forecasting to help farmers to be prepared for extreme events."

Comments:
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  1. Anonymous says:

    Temperatures have not risen over the past 15 years, making a mockery of the computer programs that showed temperatures rising in lockstep with carbon dioxide.

  2. Anonymous says:

    How can anyone take these people serious. Ms Morton a sociologist. I think she is a little out in left field, not much grows there anyway. We are not in control. The climate has been changing for ever and it isn't because of man.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Potential cause of climate change. I know, we are all surprised. http://vimeo.com/30119927#

  4. Anonymous says:

    I the use of the word climate change in their arguments. Do they think we are idiots. The climate has been changing ever since there has been climate.

  5. Anonymous says:

    "Bill Hohenstein, director of the USDA climate change program, said the scientific evidence that links increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere with increasing temperatures is conclusive" So let me get this straight....CO2 makes up 0.0387% percent of the Atmosphere of Earth if we increase it by a power of 10 it still will not = 1% of the Earth Atmosphere and we are 100% convinced CO2 in causing Global warming????? Come on let us worry about other things in life.

  6. Anonymous says:

    The tranquil weather experienced as the recovery from the LIA continued was welcome. The regime change to cool has started, which is NOT welcome. I agree 100% that the changing climate to a period of extended cooling will be dramatic.