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Great Leaders, Part Two: Passion

Managing Talent

Leaders have passion that inspires action

Published on: December 11, 2012

I have had quite a few coaches in my days and I couldn't even name all of them. Although, one coach I distinctly remember and cherish to this day. He had this way about him. He commanded greatness from his players. He believed we were the best and with his confidence a team ego developed, one that gave us a presence when going up against our competition.

He got us to work harder than any other coach and you knew in his heart he wanted nothing more than greatness for each of us. He was so passionate that in turn we became passionate.  That passion can be found in every great leader.

Great leaders have that "fire in the belly."  They believe with every ounce of their body that their vision is the best route to take the company or farm to new heights. They do not look to follow the path of their neighbor; they are set on creating their own path. They refuse to settle for mediocrity for themselves or their staff; they are looking to go beyond what people believe they can do. They have an overwhelming amount of belief in what they do and their passion is infectious.

How does one get passion to drive a company? As a leader you believe strongly in your vision for the organization. You are committed to it. Your plan for achieving the vision is clear and precise and everyone knows what the plan is. You over communicate the vision and you ignite enthusiasm throughout the company. 

At every opportunity through talks in the field, meetings over lunch or visualization you constantly reinforce where the company is heading and how "we" can get there. Give it an extra push by rewarding those that go above and beyond to support the vision. 

The common flaw of leaders is that they don't express their vision for the business or how they are going to get there. They don't want to be that committed in the event they want to change their mind or fear they will ultimately fail.

Having no vision just leaves your employees lost. They can't get excited if they have no overall purpose that they are working towards. There will be no camaraderie if there is no shared goal. Of course the industry of agriculture is dynamic and there are lots of variables, but using that as an excuse for not setting the vision and path for your staff ultimately limits your farm's potential. Don't let that happen to you.